Employment

United Kingdom: Reopening for Business Essential Checklists for UK In-House Counsel

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Businesses have to be adaptable when navigating the business and legal impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Our Resilience, Recovery & Renewal model supports organizations...

United Kingdom: ‘No Deal’ Brexit Checklist: Key Implications for Business

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The UK Government's refusal to request an extension to the Brexit transition period, along with the outstanding issues in the negotiations, means that the...

Latin America: “The New Normal”: Restart of Economic Activities and Sanitary Measures in Latin...

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The COVID-19 pandemic has affected all countries in Latin America. Administrative measures that limit or restrict economic activity have been adopted in most countries....

Doing Business in China 2020

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 The Doing Business in China guide provides an introduction to selected aspects relating to investment and business operations in the People’s Republic of China...

US 50 State Shelter-in-Place / Reopening Tracker

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Shelter-in-place or stay-at-home orders have been prevalent throughout the United States since March 2020 as state and local governments have sought to protect their...

Czech Republic: Baker McKenzie for Startups

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Welcome to the “BM for Startups” project by Baker McKenzie PragueThe program is intended for startups in the area of IT and online services...

United States: Employee Non-Solicitation Clauses in California – Quickly Clearing up the Confusion

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For decades California employers have relied on a 1985 decision to enforce contractual provisions prohibiting solicitation of employees after termination; but a lot happened to change this in November 2018 with the California Court of Appeals decision in the AMN case.  Since 2018, there have been additional developments all companies should understand.Our partners will discuss these issues and what they mean for companies doing business in California that utilize or are contemplating using employee non-solicitation clauses.

Russia: Supreme Court clarifies how companies can be held liable for illegal remuneration by...

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Russia's Supreme Court confirmed that a company can be liable under Article 19.28 of the Administrative Procedure Code (“Illegal remuneration on behalf of a legal entity”) for the actions of third parties with whom that company has no formal contractual, employment, or other legal relationship.1The court clarified that a company may be held liable if its officers either knew about such actions, or approved or instructed the respective third parties with regard to such actions. Another requirement for prosecution is that the company must have an “economic or other material interest (for example, a reputational one)” in the performance of such actions.In light of this clarification, companies now face increased risk under Article 19.28 for the illegal actions of persons such as employees of their dealers, distributors and other counterparties.

Global: Global Employment and Compensation Handbooks

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 The Global Employer: Focus on Global Immigration and Mobility 2020-2021This handbook is the go-to resource for in-house counsel, human resource managers and global relocation...

Global: What Do Employers Need to Consider When Reopening? A Video Chat Series

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Welcome to Baker McKenzie's Labor and Employment video chat series! In these quick and bite-sized video chats, our employment partners team up with practitioners...
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